Gibson Eb Guitar Sale

gibson eb

The more I got into writing this review, the more it’s felt of Gibson Eb like I was writing an episode of Mythbusters. When I write a review, I like to have a look around various forums to see what comments people are making, and to make sure that I have not overlooked any questions that people are asking about the instrument. In this case, I noticed that there are a few misconceptions about Gibson basses, as well as a few comments and opinions being shared about this bass by people who have obviously never had the opportunity to try one. Some of the comments about Gibson basses that I saw included statements that Gibson’s a guitar company and basses really aren’t a priority for them (considering the wide variety of bass models they’ve offered over the years, I think we can dismiss that myth immediately), as well as comments about their basses all sounding muddy, or complaints about them being neck-heavy, or not very versatile from a sonic standpoint. Are these comments based on facts that apply to the EB Bass, or just examples of the uninformed and baseless opinions you sometimes read online? We’ll be considering all of those things, and much more, as the review progresses.

gibson eb-1 violin bass’s first bass, the Gibson Eb Guitar Sale jack bruce sg bass, was a violin-shaped instrument that was first introduced back in 1953. Later EB series basses like the EB-0 (1959) and EB-3 (1961) both featured more SG-inspired body shapes after the SG-Les Paul’s introduction in 1961. Although the EB-3L was available for players who wanted a 34″ scale length, both models more commonly came with short scale (30.5″) necks. While some of these earlier basses did indeed sound rather dark, their original goal was to replicate an upright bass tone, which is darker too. As time went on, Gibson’s basses also changed, and many models that were introduced in the 70s or later are far from dark or muddy-sounding, so there’s another myth busted.

Gibson claims the new EB (which stands for “Electric Bass”) has an “SG-derived body”, and while there may be some hints of the SG shape in the elongated horns of the EB body’s asymmetrical double-cutaway, it’s still quite a departure from the SG itself, or the earlier EB series basses (such as the EB-0 and EB-3) that were more obviously SG-inspired. To me, the body contours and cutaway shape is almost more of a cross between a traditional EB-3 and a mid-70s era Gibson Ripper or Grabber. The horns are less pointy than the SG-shaped EB-3, but not as thin and elongated as the Grabber, and there are subtle hints of Mosrite also thrown into the mix in the way the back of the body is curved. I think it looks pretty cool, and while opinions about the looks of the bass are going to come down (as always) to the tastes of the individual, the questions remain – how does it perform, and is there any truth to the rest of the myths? Let’s find out…

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