Eb Bass

Eb Bass

Do yo like this Eb Bass and want to own one? It is a good news for you that it is still available in our shop, and you can get in a short time with a reasonable price.

Julien’s reserves the right to withdraw any property before the sale and will have no liability for doing so.

We reserve the right to accept or decline any bid. Bids must be for an entire lot and each lot constitutes a separate sale. All bids are per lot unless otherwise announced at a live sale by the auctioneer. Live auction lots will be sold in their numbered sequence unless the Auctioneer directs otherwise. It is unlawful and illegal for Bidders to collude, pool, or agree with another Bidder to pay less than the fair value for lot(s). Bidders participating in both live and online auctions acknowledge that the law provides for substantial penalties in the form of treble damages and attorneys’ fees and costs of Eb Bass for those who violate these provisions. For live auctions the auctioneer will have final discretion in the event that any dispute should arise between bidders.

The auctioneer will determine the successful bidder, cancel the sale, or re-offer and resell the lot or lots in dispute. Julien’s will have final discretion to resolve any disputes arising after the sale and in online auctions. If any dispute arises our sale record is conclusive. Julien’s will execute order or absentee bids, and accept telephone bids as a courtesy to clients who are unable to attend the live auctions. Therefore we take no responsibility for any errors or omissions in connection with this service.

Subject to fulfillment of all of the conditions set forth herein, on the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer, title to the offered lot will pass to the highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer, and such bidder thereupon (a) assumes full risk and responsibility (including without limitation, liability for or damage to frames or glass covering prints, paintings, photos, or other works), and (b) will immediately pay the full purchase price or such part as we may require. In addition to other remedies available to us by law, we reserve the right to impose from the date of sale a late charge of 1 ½% per month of the total purchase price if payment is not made in accordance with the conditions set forth herein. All property must be removed from either our premises by the purchaser at his expense not later than 10 business days following its sale and if it is not so removed, (i) a handling charge of 1% of the total purchase price per month from the tenth day after the sale until its removal will be payable to us by the purchaser, with a minimum of 5% of the total purchase price for any property not so removed within 60 days after the sale, and (ii) we may send the purchased property to a public warehouse for the account, at the risk and expense of the purchaser.

If any applicable conditions of gibson eb1 bass herein are not complied with the purchaser will be in default and in addition to any and all other remedies available to us and the Consignor by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the purchaser liable for the total purchase price, including all fees, charges and expenses more fully set forth herein, we, at our option, may (a) cancel the sale of that, or any other lots sold to the defaulting purchaser at the same or any other auction, retaining as liquidated damages all payments made by the purchaser, or (b) resell the purchased property, whether at public auction or by private sale, or (c) effect any combination thereof. In any case, the purchaser will be liable for any deficiency, any and all costs, handling charges, late charges, expenses of both sales, our commissions on both sales at our regular rates, legal fees and expenses, collection fees and incidental damages.

Gibson Eb Guitar Sale

gibson eb

The more I got into writing this review, the more it’s felt of Gibson Eb like I was writing an episode of Mythbusters. When I write a review, I like to have a look around various forums to see what comments people are making, and to make sure that I have not overlooked any questions that people are asking about the instrument. In this case, I noticed that there are a few misconceptions about Gibson basses, as well as a few comments and opinions being shared about this bass by people who have obviously never had the opportunity to try one. Some of the comments about Gibson basses that I saw included statements that Gibson’s a guitar company and basses really aren’t a priority for them (considering the wide variety of bass models they’ve offered over the years, I think we can dismiss that myth immediately), as well as comments about their basses all sounding muddy, or complaints about them being neck-heavy, or not very versatile from a sonic standpoint. Are these comments based on facts that apply to the EB Bass, or just examples of the uninformed and baseless opinions you sometimes read online? We’ll be considering all of those things, and much more, as the review progresses.

gibson eb-1 violin bass’s first bass, the Gibson Eb Guitar Sale jack bruce sg bass, was a violin-shaped instrument that was first introduced back in 1953. Later EB series basses like the EB-0 (1959) and EB-3 (1961) both featured more SG-inspired body shapes after the SG-Les Paul’s introduction in 1961. Although the EB-3L was available for players who wanted a 34″ scale length, both models more commonly came with short scale (30.5″) necks. While some of these earlier basses did indeed sound rather dark, their original goal was to replicate an upright bass tone, which is darker too. As time went on, Gibson’s basses also changed, and many models that were introduced in the 70s or later are far from dark or muddy-sounding, so there’s another myth busted.

Gibson claims the new EB (which stands for “Electric Bass”) has an “SG-derived body”, and while there may be some hints of the SG shape in the elongated horns of the EB body’s asymmetrical double-cutaway, it’s still quite a departure from the SG itself, or the earlier EB series basses (such as the EB-0 and EB-3) that were more obviously SG-inspired. To me, the body contours and cutaway shape is almost more of a cross between a traditional EB-3 and a mid-70s era Gibson Ripper or Grabber. The horns are less pointy than the SG-shaped EB-3, but not as thin and elongated as the Grabber, and there are subtle hints of Mosrite also thrown into the mix in the way the back of the body is curved. I think it looks pretty cool, and while opinions about the looks of the bass are going to come down (as always) to the tastes of the individual, the questions remain – how does it perform, and is there any truth to the rest of the myths? Let’s find out…